How to Calculate Child Support: Why the Amount Varies

Child Support can be a contentious issue even in an otherwise agreeable divorce.  The calculations involved might seem worthy of NASA scientists.  But once you know the basics, the question of how to calculate child support in Texas becomes more manageable.

Your divorce settlement probably has or will have, a specified monthly amount allocated for child support.  This is calculated based on your income, how many children you have, and what your other obligations are.  If you’re unsure how to calculate child support based on your monthly revenues, begin by adding up the following sources of income:

–annual salary or total hourly wages and tips

–income from properties you rent

–royalties or consulting fees

–income from self-employment

–business profits

You do not have to include these types of income:

–state assistance received for foster children

–TANF, SNAP, or WIC benefits

–the income of your new spouse

Once you have an annual total, divide by twelve.  Then subtract your state, federal, and social security taxes paid.  You can also subtract union dues and whatever you’re already paying for your children’s medical insurance.  The leftover income is then used as a basis to calculate your monthly support payment.  How to calculate child support from there depends on how many children there are, and what their specific needs are.  This will vary from one family to another, so two fathers with the same income may have vastly different responsibilities.

Does this already seem confusing?  That’s okay.  If you have a divorce lawyer, they can help you better understand the process.  If not, it’s a good idea to consult with a family law attorney before your child support amount is approved by a judge.  Jennifer Espronceda is passionate about protecting the rights of fathers and helping them maintain a healthy relationship with their children.  Contact Jennifer@EsproncedaLaw.com to arrange a consultation or phone 210-504-1514.

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