What Goes Into Effective Divorce Litigation?

Nobody gets married with a plan to get divorced.  This means that you’ve probably never thought to research divorce law until you own divorce was imminent.  There is a lot that goes into effectively litigating a divorce.  You’ll want to know what to look for before you hire someone.  A local attorney will be well versed in the specific laws in your state.  In Texas, for example, there is a sixty-day waiting period between the divorce papers being filed and them being signed by a judge.  When you need effective divorce litigation, this type of knowledge is invaluable.  Does your state offer trial separations?  Are there exceptions in cases where domestic violence or infidelity is present?  What about custody?  Alimony?

 

All of these factors can play a part in your divorce proceedings.  This is why securing the services of an attorney with family law experience is vital.  They will know how to gather and secure sensitive information, and how to negotiate effectively with other lawyers in your town.  Effective divorce litigation for your case can depend on your specific needs.  You should discuss openly with your lawyer your intended outcome and what concessions you’re prepared to make.  The attorney you hire should listen without judgment, and clearly explain to you the legal ramifications of your choices.  This allows you to make informed choices, which can make all the difference.

 

Divorce litigation need not be acrimonious.  Whether your divorce is contested, or agreed (in which both parties define their own agreements without litigation), having a lawyer on your side is the most effective way to understand each facet of the proceedings.  This ensures that you’re making the best decisions for you and any children involved.  To summarize: look for experience in family litigation, knowledge of local and state laws, professionalism, and a willingness to discuss your case with you in detail.  These factors can make the difference between a smooth, amiable divorce, and one that stretches out far too long and costs far too much.

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